Stretching Techniques for Alleviating Muscle & Joint Pain
MFC - Worksite fitness is the new gym
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

FIT Tips to Fuel Up Right Your Workout
How to Stay Fit Despite a Demanding Job
Join my 15 day FITNESS CHALLENGE
MY TOP 10 REASONS TO MANAGE YOUR FITNESS
Survival strategy to keep holiday pounds off

Categories

"Better Sweaty BOGO & REFERRAL REWARDS
"BETTER SWEATY THAN DEAD" LABOR DAY SHOUT OUT
"Kudos to Kathy"
"Major Results Guaranteed or I'll train you for free"
"WORK SMARTER / NOT HARDER"
10 Walking Mistakes to Avoid (part 1)
15 day FITNESS CHALLENGE
15 MINUTE START SMART/ QUICK FIT
2 Fitness fortune cookies
2012 Starting a walking program
2012 Weight Lose & Fitness challenge "ON YOUR MARK"
3 FIT TIPS prevent ouverindulging at holiday parties
4 reasons to eat STEAL CUT OATMEAL
5 "ORGANIC" Foods you should NEVER eat
5 REASONS MOST DIETS DON'T WORK
5 reasons why women should lift weights
5 Ways to De-stress Your Holiday Season
5k training
6 Best foods for Runners
6:19 Twelve minute mile ???
A BIG THANK YOU TO Tammie Spence and Paul Bozik.
A few more reasons why women need to lift weights
Adults who sat for 11 hours or more a day had a 40 percent greater risk of dying in the next three y
Ann's House 5k race
ARE YOU WEARING YOUR PEDOMETER
Ask an expert
Ask Major Fitness free (detox*cleanse)
B.C.M Body Centered Maintenance
Better Sweaty than Dead Boot Camp
BETTER SWEATY WHO'S BAD?
Beware 5 foods that will ruin your results
Blog me @ majorfitnessbootcamp and tell me why.
BODY FAT RATING SCALE & BMI video
Boot Camp Rx
Bounce-back-ability
BSTD BOOT CAMP
Build your BEST BODY EVER!!!
Burn more fat during your workouts (INSIDER TIPS)
Challenge Assumptions
Check this out...
Congrats Patty G and Paul B above average 4 ot of 4
CORPORATE FITNESS CHALLENGE 2012 Millercoors "Are you Ready"?
Corporate Fitness Challenge Week 3 workout pics
Corporate Fitness Marathon Challenge 1/17/2012
CORPROATE FITNESS CHALLENGE WINNER IS????
Daily fitness fortune cookie
Deceivingly "Diet"
Don, Smart Start in action...
Don't be fooled 9 Foods That Can Fool You
Don't forget your weekly check in
Everyone loves a good snack
Exercise and Arthritis
FATS, The good, The Bad and the neutral
FIT "FITNESS" into your routine with FIT 15
FIT FACT-Flexibility Training Do's and Dont's
FIT FACTS
FIT N 15 ACCOUNTABILITY IS KEY!
FIT N 15 join today and your first week is free!
FIT15
FITness FIFteen one size doesn't fit all
FITNESS FORTUNE COOKIE
fitness fortune cookie #6
FITNESS FORTUNE COOKIE #7
Fitness is a Business Strategy
FREE BOOT CAMP FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER
Free FIT N 15 !!!
Free FIT N 15 test drive (limited offer)
Free FIT N 15 this Wednesday only limit 12
FREE fitness test drive this Saturday 7/9/2011
Free Friday boot camp
Free Manicure & Pedicure
GET ACTIVE MillerCoors!
GOAL SETTING
Healthiest Employer MillerCoors???
HOLIDAY SQUAT - A - THON
How BAD do you want it MillerCoors?
HOW BAD DO YOU WANT IT?
How Can I Have a Healthier Thanksgiving?
How do you WORK FITNESS into your day?
How Much Protein Do I Need?
How much time do you spend on staying healthy?
How would YOU like a free month of bootcamp?
I CAN I CAN I CAN
I DARE YOU TO JOURNAL
I did not require physical therapy/ Thad's video update
If you had to choose between 10 lbs over fit & healthy or
If you're sick and tired
INVEST IN YOUR HEALTH TODAY!!!
Investing in Workplace Wellness
Is 100% Whole Wheat bread bad?
kick start wellness/365
ladies combat fat e-book
Ladies learn the facts
Life style
MAJOR CORPORATE WELLNESS
Major FITness 15 Movement prep STRETCH
Major Fitness assessment
Major Fitness Corporate
MAJOR FITNESS/365
Major is the real deal in fitness
MILLERCOORS 30% discount and 2 free assessments
MillerCoors Brewery Trenton has Spoken!!!
MILLERCOORS DISCOUNT
MillerCoors Flexibility training
MillerCoors Free FIT N 15 Fat burning cardio test drive.
MILLERCOORS FREE WEIGHT LOSS ASSESSMENT
MillerCoors Thanks for your BLOG post
MillerCoors weight loss challenge (I want that trophy)!
MillerCoors Workout for Wellness
MILLERCOORS, COUNT DOWN TO THE PIG
MillerCoors, Major Fitness testimonials
MILLERCOORS, START SMART FLEXIBILITY FREE CONSULT !!!
MillerCoors, when you hit your mental wall
MillerF.I.I.T ASSESSMENT WEEK/Coors 64,000 step challenge/Paige's 5k/Pig Congrats/
Move your body "Flash Mob" Heirs Covenant Church of Cincinnati
MY TOP 10 REASONS TO MANAGE YOUR FITNESS
Nate's Mission
NEW SPRING FITness 401K Plan
NEW TEACHERS Boot Camp
No Boundries, No Limits
nutrion
Nutrition
Oatmeal beaware
One size doesn't fit all FITness FIFteen!
Part 2 Your Game plan
Perks With a Payoff
Pop quiz, What's the single biggest source of calories
Prevent Back injury with PBM
PROTECT YOUR BODY FROM INJURY
QF-30/3D (Quick FIT30 3x per week) QF-30/2D (Quick FIT 2 Days per week)
QUICK BREAKFAST FOR PEOPLE ON THE GO
RE ASSESSMENT WEEK 52 SIGNED UP
Re assessments start Monday Feb 20 2012
REASONS TO BE FIT
Should I HIRE a Personal Trainer? Final assessmnet week 3/26/12
SMART START
Smart Start Preventive Maintenance
SPECIAL FORCES TROOP GLENDALE
Special offer to all MillerCoors -Weight Watchers participants
START SMART (NO DIET) GAME PLAN
Start Smart bring Wellness & Fitness to the workforce
START SMART LOW /BACK CONSULT TODAY!!!
Start Smart Move Smart #2
START SMART PREVENITIVE MAINTENENCE
START SMART/ MOVE SMART (Check don's video)
STOP EXERCISING!!!
Stretching 101
TAKE A MORE ACTIVE ROLE IN YOUR HEALTH
Tammie's 5 REASON
TEAMWORK+WELLNESS = SUCCESS!
testimonial
The #1 excuse is.........................
The BeneFITs of exercise
The best fat burner fruits to eat for breakfast are????
The COMMITTED @ MILLERCOORS Brewery, Trenton
The Event (Save the date)
The female WINNER is ????
The four P's
THE LAMEST excuse ever...
the President's fitness challenge
THE TRUTH, What does bodyweight tell you
The Winner of the MillerCoors Plank off is????
There is no such thing as a magic pill or
Things You Can Accomplish In 15 Minutes
TRAINERS RANT
ultimate goals
Unhealthy Employees
WALK IT OFF 10,000
WARNING POP OUTKILLS TERROIST
Warning run don't walk
Weekend warrior workout
Weight Gain Season Begins part 2
Weight Gain Season Begins, do you have a plan?
Wellness
Wellness as a business STRATEGY!
Wellness as a state of health
What do you do to avoid exercise BURNOUT?
WHAT IS COMMITMENT?
What the results mean (Aerobic)
what to eat before a workout
What to eat for lunch?
What's your MOTIVATION?
Who's holding you accountible
why Major FITness
WOMENS FIT CAMP PICS CHECK IT OUT
WOMENS FIT CAMP REMINDER video
Womens fit camp update video (ruff cut)
Womens Fitness REVOLUTION 5 ways to nurture self
Womens Only Out door Fit Camp
Workouts ON A EMPTY STOMACH
WORKPLACE WELLNESS
You have the body that you accept
You really should get out more.
powered by

MAJOR FITNESS BLOG

Stretching Techniques for Alleviating Muscle & Joint Pain

Stretching Techniques for Alleviating
Muscle and Joint Pain (Part 2)
 
While part 1 focused on how to develop and implement a self-myofascial release (SMR) program to successfully help alleviate muscle and joint pain, this current installment demonstrates how to progress your corrective exercise strategies.
 
When to Use Stretching Exercises in Corrective Exercise Programs
Every corrective exercise program should begin with the introduction of SMR techniques, progress to stretching and, ultimately, incorporate strengthening exercises. This marks the beginning of retraining the way my client moves by increasing range of movement and the mobility they experience when performing both daily activities and the movements required in their chosen activities and sports.
 
Types of Stretching Exercises
There are many different stretching techniques. The three most widely used are categorized as passive/static, active and dynamic (Blahnik, 2011). Each technique offers a unique benefit to clients as they prepare for the next stage of their corrective exercise program.
 
Passive/Static Stretching
Passive stretching involves holding a static position (with assistance from something like your hand, a yoga strap, the wall, the ground or another person) for a predetermined amount of time to encourage increased range of movement around a joint or number of joints. This type of stretching is very useful in the early stages of a client’s stretching program. It enables individuals to control the elongation of a muscle (or group of muscles) and helps build confidence in relearning movements that may have been avoided due to pain and/or injury. A standing calf stretch is an example of a passive stretch.
 
Calf Stretch
Excessive lumbar lordosis is accompanied by a forwardly rotated pelvis (i.e., an anterior pelvic tilt). This forward shift of the lumbar spine and tilt of the pelvis tips an individual’s entire body weight forward. This disruption in balance requires the calf muscles to work harder to stop the body from toppling forward. Stretching the calf muscles (in particular the gastrocnemius) helps shift the body weight back into the heels and allows the pelvis to posteriorly rotate and the lumbar spine to flex more effectively. This can help reduce some of the symptoms associated with excessive lumbar lordosis (Kendall et. al, 2005).
Stand with the feet facing forward in a staggered stance (left foot forward and right foot back) and pelvis tucked under. Gently lean forward while keeping both feet in contact with the ground. Hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds and repeat on the other side. Pull up on the toes of the right leg to activate the anterior tibialis to progress this stretch, if needed. 
 
Active Stretching
Active stretching requires your client to hold the target muscle(s) in a stretch position while simultaneously contracting the antagonist or opposing muscle(s). It is a great way to begin integrating different functions of muscles or muscle groups to work together to mimic how the body works while in motion (Price, 2010). Activating (or contracting) the gluteus maximus muscle to facilitate a better stretch of the hip flexors is an example of an active stretching exercise. (see Hip-flexor Stretch sample)
 
 
 
 
 
Hip-flexor Stretch
The hip flexor muscles originate on the lumbar spine, cross the pelvis and insert on the inside of the upper leg. When these muscles are tight or restricted they pull the lumbar spine forward, exacerbating excessive lumbar lordosis. Stretching the hip flexors helps release these tissues and allows the lumbar spine to flex more effectively (McGill, 2002).
Kneel down on the right knee with the left foot forward. Tuck the pelvis under to help decrease the arch in the lower back. Align the hips left to right and then gently raise the right arm. A stretch should be felt in the front of the right hip/leg. Hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds and repeat on the other side. Squeezing the gluteal muscles during this exercise can increase the intensity of the stretch. 
 
 
Dynamic Stretching
 
Dynamic stretches are used to mimic real-life movements. They involve the use of multiple muscles contracting to move any number of bones while other muscles lengthen to allow motion of these body parts to occur. This type of stretching helps clients learn to perform a desired movement while still being observed and coached in a controlled and coordinated manner. The Step Back with Arm Raise stretch is an example of a dynamic stretch.
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Benefits of Stretching
When combined with a program of self-massage, stretching is an effective tool for releasing excess tension from muscles and fascia, increasing overall tissue health and promoting repair, decreasing stress and increasing range of movement. Additionally, stretching can further warm up tissues to prepare muscles and joints for more complex movements and decrease the risk of potential injury.
Stretching also involves moving the body in directions that mimic the way the body should move when it is working properly. Therefore, correctly performed stretches are vital for re-educating the nervous system about pain-free movement. They also help set the stage for progressing the neuromuscular system into the strengthening phase of a corrective exercise program (Price, 2010).
 
Developing a Stretching Program
Which muscles need stretching?
The key to knowing which muscles need stretching is to perform a series of systematic posture and structural assessments during your initial consultations with clients to identify any bony structures that are misaligned, immobile or not functioning as they should (American Council on Exercise, 2014). You can then utilize these assessment results to identify those muscles that attach to or influence those bony structures to determine what needs to be addressed as part of your corrective stretching program. For example, if your postural assessment reveals that your client has excessive lumbar lordosis (i.e., an overarching of the lower back), you could incorporate (among other exercises) a stretch for the back extensors to help promote better lumbar spine flexion (see Lower-back Stretch in the sample program below).
Lower-back Stretch
Excessive lumbar lordosis is characterized by an overly arched lower back and tight lumbar erector spinae muscles. Stretching the lumbar extensors helps the lumbar spine flex more effectively (Gray, 1995).
Sit on the floor with the knees bent and feet forward. Grab the backs of the knees, posteriorly tilt the pelvis and lean forward to round the lower back. Hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds. Progress this stretch by actively contracting the abdominal muscles.
 
 
Another way to ascertain what muscles need stretching is to ask your client during the initial consultation about past or current injuries, habitual movement patterns and activities, work environments, postural habits, diagnoses of degenerative changes, and disease that might be affecting the health and function of various soft-tissue structures. For example, if you note that your client spends most of the day seated at a computer in hip flexion, then a stretch to help promote better hip extension would be a beneficial addition to his or her program.
You can also use feedback from your client’s SMR program to identify which muscles are restricted or need additional help with specific and targeted stretches. For example, if your client reports a lot of muscle tension or discomfort while performing an SMR technique for the lower back, incorporating a lower-back stretch into his or her program could help improve the health and elasticity of those tissues.
 
 
Stretching Exercises: Progressions, Regressions and Precautions
There are many program variables that must be considered to ensure a safe and successful environment when progressing and/or regressing your stretching program.
 
Progressions
  1. Progress a passive stretch to a more complex or dynamic stretch that integrates other parts of the body when a client has demonstrated his or her ability to perform this basic type of stretch correctly.
  2. Progress to a strengthening exercise as a client gains control of greater ranges of movement during a stretching exercise (Price, 2010). (Strengthening exercises will be discussed in detail in part 3 of this series.)
Regressions
  1. Always regress a stretching exercise to a more subtle stretch (or regress further to a SMR technique) if a client is in pain or experiencing discomfort (Price, 2013).
  2. Regress a stretching exercise if a client has difficulty performing the exercise or remaining in control of the movement.
  3. Many standing or kneeling stretches require a client to remain balanced during the movement. If a client has trouble balancing during a stretch, regress that exercise to a stretch with less balance demands.
Precautions
  1. Do not persist with trying to stretch chronically restricted muscles or tissues, or try to move a joint into a place where it does not feel comfortable. This may cause the structures in that area to tighten even further to protect any injured or inflamed body part(s) from moving.
  2. Ballistic stretching that involves bouncing or pulsing into a stretch may cause further injury to clients who are in chronic pain and should be avoided.
  3. The muscles and tissues to be stretched should be thoroughly warmed up before having clients begin their stretching programs. The SMR exercises described in the first article of this series can be used to help increase the core temperature of the tissues prior to stretching.
  4. Remember that all of the soft tissues in the body contain a lot of water. Therefore, it is imperative that your clients are well hydrated before beginning any portion of their corrective exercise program and remain hydrated during and after exercise.
 
Sample Stretching Program
A common postural deviation that causes both muscle and joint pain is excessive lumbar lordosis (i.e., an overly arched lower back). (Note: Refer to the Wall Test assessment for the lumbar spine, if necessary.) Stretching the major muscle groups that are affected by this common imbalance not only helps alleviate pain in the lower back, but can also take stress off all the structures these muscles affect (i.e., knees, hips, sacroiliac joints and upper back).
 
Abdominals Stretch
Excessive lumbar lordosis is accompanied by excessive thoracic kyphosis (i.e., an over-rounding of the upper back). The upper back rounds to counterbalance the overarching of the lower back to help maintain the body’s center of gravity (Kendall et al., 2005). Stretching the abdominal muscles helps promote extension in the thoracic spine, allowing the lumbar spine to relax from its overly extended position and flex more effectively.
Stand in a doorframe and reach the left arm overhead and grasp the side of the frame above head level. Place the right hand lower on the frame at thigh level and tuck the left foot behind the right foot. Push the left hip away from the hands while lifting the torso upright to stretch the left hip, abdominals and muscles around the shoulder and rib cage. Hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds and repeat on the other side. To progress this stretch, gently rotate the sternum away from the doorframe while preventing the hips from rotating.
 
 
 
Step Back With Arm Raise Stretch
As discussed earlier, excessive lumbar lordosis is accompanied by tight calves, hip flexors, lumbar erectors and abdominals (among others) (Myers, 2001). As your client becomes proficient at stretching these muscles individually, you can combine all these body parts into the following dynamic/integrated body stretch. This type of full-body progression is the ultimate goal of your stretching program.
Step back with the right leg while raising the right arm overhead. Make sure both feet are facing forward and that the pelvis is tucked under to decrease the arch in the lower back. Keep the shoulder back and down and raise the right arm. Complete the movement on the right side by stepping forward with the right leg while bringing the right arm down. Next, step backward with the left leg and raise the left arm to complete the movement on the left side. Repeat on both sides six to 10 times.
 
Conclusion
 
Progressing a corrective exercise program from SMR exercises to strategic stretching exercises will help the client regain confidence in his or her ability to move without pain. As your client continues to improve and regain function, you can begin introducing appropriate strengthening exercises into his or her program.
 
 
 
Join me for my Tuesday Flex and stretch and
Thursday mornings Flex & SMR training
9:30-10:00 AM  Ice House
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Major Corporate Wellness
Fitness expert & Corporate Wellness coach
Well-being , healthy productivity, on the job and life.

1 Comment to Stretching Techniques for Alleviating Muscle & Joint Pain:

Comments RSS
chanel on Friday, June 05, 2015 9:16 PM
Textile band are numerous - Audemars Piguet features a multitude of embroidered man made fibre versions in several of their females designer watches.
Reply to comment

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment